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Relief Aid Scarce in Haiti; Death Toll Rises

February 10, 2010

The death toll is rising in Haiti… and people are still suffering… Here’s a report of what’s happening on the ground in terms of relief.

Watch the Democracy Now segment: “Haiti Toll Revised to 230,000, Journalist Lindsay Reed reports on the scarcity of aid in devastated Port-Au-Prince” – which aired on today’s show.

One month after the earthquake in Haiti, the official death toll is now at 230,000. On Tuesday, Haitian Prime Minister Jean-Max Bellerive said it would take another ten years to rebuild Haiti and admitted officials have no clear plan for relocating the one million Haitians made homeless by the earthquake. We go to the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince to speak with journalist Reed Lindsay.

via Democracy Now

Here’s another news report on BBC News about the death toll:

Haiti’s government says around 230,000 people died in last month’s earthquake, 18,000 more than its previous estimate.

Communications Minister Marie-Laurence Jocelyn Lassegue said the toll was not definitive. About 300,000 were injured.

The latest figure does not include bodies buried by private funeral homes in private cemeteries, or the dead buried by their own families.

The one-month anniversary of the catastrophic quake – on 12 February – is to be marked with prayer vigils and fasting.

A BBC correspondent in the capital Port-au-Prince says there is increasing concern that with the rainy season approaching, the lack of tents and temporary shelter could lead to the outbreak of disease.

via BBC News

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